Child Custody Modification – Parents’ Custody Rights

Parents do have child custody rights to make modifications to their custody order. If the circumstances of the parents change, or it is in the best interest of the children to adjust the arrangements, the parents can get the court to accept a custody order modification. Before a parent begins this process, there are several things to keep in mind.

The easiest way for a mother or father to get a custody modification is to talk to the other parent and get them to agree to the changes. If both parents support the changes, they merely have to file some papers with the court and the custody order is modified. So, the first thing to do for a custody modification is to communicate with the other parents. If James talks to Lisa about his work schedule and they come up with a new custody and visitation plan together, the order is very simple to modify.

Mothers Rights – Child Custody For Mothers

By Steven Carlson

Mothers rights to custody and the standard by which custody determinations are made in the family courts has changed significantly over the last century. In the early 1900′s, fathers were typically given custody of the children in the case of a divorce. In contested child custody cases today, in which the mother earns less than the father, it does not automatically entitle the father to custody of the child in the event of a divorce.

Following the standards in the early 1900′s which typically gave fathers custody of the children, states shifted to the tender years doctrine which presumed the mothers to be the primary caregiver. This standard changed yet again. Following the 1970′s the tender years doctrine was replaced with the overall best interests of the child standard. The overall best interest of the child standard takes several factors into consideration and is supposed to guide the family courts in child custody determinations. Nevertheless, some family courts in the 20th century continue to favor the mother as the primary caregiver.

Mothers often provide primary care for their children and are often involved in the day to day responsibilities of raising and nurturing their children. While some mothers may be at a disadvantage financially at the beginning of their divorce, more mothers are becoming educated with strategies and information on how to enhance their custody case and how other mothers are obtaining custody of their children.

Mothers and fathers both have a prominent role to play in supporting the growth and development of their children. But when parents divorce and child custody is contested, the family courts are faced with the difficult task of determining where the child will live and what parenting arrangement is in the best interest of the child. Upon divorce, the best parent is generally having both parents involved. More and more, the courts are adopting this mentality and favoring frequent and continuing contact with both parents as the best arrangement for the child. Additionally, more and more mothers are taking on the same attitude for the benefit of their children and are benefiting from the shared parenting responsibilities as a result.

Copyright © 2008 Child Custody Coach

Child Custody Coach supplies information, written materials, online materials, and coaching services to parents in the field of child custody, namely, divorce, child custody and visitation issues, child custody evaluations, child custody mothers issues, and parenting. Custody Match is an online consumer and family law attorney matching service to help consumers find the right Southern California child custody lawyer.

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See Also Parenting Articles by Dr. Randy Cale at www.TerrificParenting.com

Single Parenting – The Pros and Cons

By Donald Saunders

With divorce rates now at record high levels the number of children living in single parent homes is higher than ever and whether you’re a mom or a dad single parenting presents you with some unique challenges.

The first set of problems that a single parent faces are practical and, as most single parents these days have to work, these involve such things as finding suitable day-care, making arrangements when having to work late or at weekends and fitting in everyday activities such as shopping.

How you cope with these practical difficulties will depend very much on your personal circumstances and financial position, but many single parents are often able to rely on older children to care for younger ones and on help from family and friends. In most cases these problems are not too difficult to overcome and a reasonable solution can usually be found.

It is often issues beyond the purely practical that present single parents with the greatest challenge and the loss of a partner to discuss problems with, to use as a sounding board and to bounce ideas off can be difficult.

Some parents also find it difficult to deal with children of the opposite sex and, in particular, miss the input from the same sex parent who is able to draw on his or her own experience of childhood.

In many cases these problems can also be overcome by turning to other family members or friends for advice, but this is not always quite so easy or practical.

On the other side of the coin many of the problems posed by single parenting are balanced by what many see as often considerable advantages. The loss of a partner also frequently brings with it the loss of disagreements, arguments and tension in the household and can make it much easier to establish guidelines and rules for the children without having to debate them with a partner.

Many single parents both consciously or sub-consciously make a greater effort to spend time with their children and also find themselves talking far more to their children. The result is that single parents often grow much closer to their children and a much stronger bond develops between parent an children, to the benefit of both.

It is often the case that children in single parent households also mature at a younger age and develop a greater sense of responsibility. Studies also show that children of single parents suffer no detrimental effects in terms of both their personal and educational development.

While on the one hand it may seem that the loss of a partner to share in the care of the children would be detrimental, single parenting provides a unique opportunity for you to influence the development of your children without the hindrance that having a partner can often bring. Additionally, as long as you don’t allow yourself to become bogged down with the practicalities of raising your children alone, the benefits can often far outweigh the disadvantages.

http://www.Parenting4Dummies.com provides information and advice on a wide range of topics including child parenting, only child parenting, parenting teenagers, step parenting, divorced parenting and the science of parenting.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/485108

See Also Parenting Articles by Dr. Randy Cale at www.TerrificParenting.com